AEMA Newsletter: September/October 2018
Dear AEMA Members and Supporters,

One of the highlights of every year is of course the AEMA conference, and the 2018 event certainly did not disappoint! July saw our conference delegates enjoying two full days in Adelaide, and much merriment was had by all - as is evident from the conference report within this issue of the newsletter. The AEMA Committee is also busy finalising the details of the 2019 conference, and an announcement as to the date and location will be made very shortly. The Committee would also like to remind all of our conference presenters to consider submitting their paper as an article to JAEMA - the journal of our association in which we showcase a selection of current research from both Australian and international academics focused on the early medieval period. 

In other news, AEMA is branching out and we are hoping to sponsor a select number of panels at other conferences, as detailed in a dedicated section below. If you would like to be involved - we'd love to hear from you! Secondly, we will be looking to organise a number of social get-togethers in your capital city. Details will be forthcoming in the next issue of the newsletter.

But not all news is happy, for it is with great sadness that we report on the untimely passing of one of our loyal members, Professor Anders Ahlqvist. The Committee offers our sincere condolences to his family, friends, and colleagues.

Finally, please don't forget to keep on sending in notices of changes to the reading groups, notices of conferences and events which I may have missed, as well as notices of any new publications or personal notices you would like to share with your fellow AEMA members.

 
Erica Steiner
AEMA Newsletter Editor
Newsletter Contents
Editor's Preface
Vale Professor Anders Ahlqvist
AEMA Sponsored Conference Panels, Sessions and Study Days
AEMA 2018 Conference Report
End of Year Celebrations
Membership Renewals
JAEMA News
AEMA Member News
Recent AEMA Graduates
AEMA Member Publications
Events, Exhibitions and Seminars - Australia
Australian School of Celtic Learning - Short Courses and Study Days
Short Courses - Australia and International
Classical and Medieval Language Reading Groups - Australia
Conferences and Symposia - Australia and New Zealand
Conferences and Symposia - International
Bursaries, Prizes, and Other Items of Interest
Other Medieval Journals of Interest
AEMA Contact Details
Vale Professor Anders Ahlqvist
Professor Anders Ahlqvist, a long-term member of AEMA, passed away suddenly in his native Finland on 23 August 2018. Professor Ahlqvist joined AEMA on arriving in Australia to take up an appointment at the University of Sydney in 2008. Celticists, linguists and early medievalists the world over are mourning the premature loss of a kind and generous mentor, an inspiring teacher and a loyal friend.

Professor Ahlqvist had a distinguished career in Celtic Studies, following a PhD at Edinburgh with a spell at Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, and many years at NUI Galway. He took up the post of inaugural Sir Warwick Fairfax Professor of Celtic Studies at the University of Sydney on 1 July 2008. Earlier that year, he travelled to Sydney to meet with future colleagues, and took on the monolith of the University administration to arrange for units of study to be offered to students the following year.

On his return to Australia in June 2008, Professor Ahlqvist immediately built relationships with scholarly and community organisations. He immediately joined AEMA, ANZAMEMS, the Sydney Medieval and Renaissance Group, the Aisling Society of Sydney, the Sydney Society for Scottish History and others. On Friday 17 October 2008 he delivered his inaugural lecture to a standing-room-only audience on the topic ‘Celtic!’. The lecture reviewed material from each of the medieval and modern Celtic literary traditions.

Professor Ahlqvist began to teach at Sydney at the beginning of 2009, and for five and a half years, taught three ‘units of study’ in each semester. Every student in Defining the Celts, Old Irish, Middle Welsh and Modern Irish Linguistics received outstanding teaching and careful attention. In 2009, Professor Ahlqvist hosted a one day symposium on Early Celtic Legal Language, bringing together scholars from Sydney, Melbourne and Perth. 2010 saw him hosting the Seventh Australian Conference of Celtic Studies. Reflecting the widespread respect and friendship for him and his scholarship, an array of senior and significant scholars of Celtic from around the world came to Sydney. In 2011, he hosted a day symposium on Early Medieval Mariners in Britain and Ireland, at which colleagues from the Anglo-Saxon and Norse area of the English Department at Sydney joined Celtic Studies researchers to share scholarship on this area of interest. 2012 saw the securing of an Australian Research Council grant by Professor Ahlqvist and partners for a project on early Irish law, including a specialist conference on Medieval Celtic Law Texts at Sydney in October 2012. In 2013, he hosted the Eighth Australian Conference of Celtic Studies.

As well as his many activities in Australia, Professor Ahlqvist constantly travelled between the hemispheres, fulfilling his commitments to Celtic Studies elsewhere – examining doctoral theses, attending board meetings, planning Congresses, and much else besides. He spoke several modern and medieval languages, and usually conversed with friends and colleagues in their own preferred language.

Professor Ahlqvist retired from the Chair of Celtic Studies in December 2013. He left behind well over a hundred students who have had the privilege of being taught by an outstanding teacher and scholar. He co-edited four books in the Sydney Series in Celtic Studies and six volumes of the Australian Celtic Journal. He was a frequent participant in AEMA conferences, and contributed book reviews and peer reviewing to JAEMA. Many AEMA members benefitted from his advice, encouragement and support over the years. His contributions to scholarship in the fields of Celtic Studies, linguistics, and early medieval studies are highly significant. We are privileged that he chose to make the most recent of those contributions here in Australia, and saddened by his untimely passing.

 
Dr. Pamela O'Neill
Medieval and Early Modern Centre, University of Sydney

 
On behalf of the entire AEMA community, we would like to extend our deepest condolences to the family and friends of our esteemed member and colleague, Anders Ahlqvist, on the sad occasion of his recent passing. His contributions were many and great, and we will feel his absence keenly.
 
The AEMA Committee
AEMA Sponsored Conference Panels, Sessions, and Study Days
Following on from the announcement last issue that we are seeking AEMA members who are willing to convene sessions or panels at other conferences, the next AEMA-sponsored CFP is for a panel at IMC Leeds 2019:
 
“Materialities of Antipodal Medievalism: displaced materiality and cultural consumption of the northern Middle Ages for the peripheral medievalist.”

Antipodes are periphery to the European core, and recent developments in decolonisation and the Global Middle Ages have contributed to understanding the inherent nature of the core/periphery dialectic that subsists in medieval studies. Access for antipodal scholars (however defined) to the materialities (the products, the evidence) of medieval cultures of the northern hemisphere is heavily mediated, through hegemonic and competing mechanisms of scholarship (such as the academy) as well as through non-formal means, including popular and social media.

This panel will explore the challenges arising from the study of medieval cultures and societies when the scholar is peripherally located (academically, physically, culturally, theoretically, psychologically), what this might mean for the old hegemonies of medieval studies in Northern Europe and how we even define and do ‘medieval’ into the future. Papers will consider the varied materialities that impinge on antipodal/peripheral scholars, from any relevant discipline, looking at theoretical implications and/or exemplar case studies/analyses of relevant texts/objects/institutions.

Submissions may address one or more of the following sub-themes:
(i) the nature and impact of skewed or constrained access to the materials of medieval studies due to peripheral/antipodal location.
(ii) regimes of circulation and consumption and the links, networks, and systems that underpin or undermine material access for the antipodal/peripheral scholar.
(iii) power, hegemony and post-colonial perspectives on global scholarship.
(iv) the impact of materialities on memory, and how selective, skewed or constrained access to these shape/skew an antipodal/peripheral view of the past.
(v) the impact of antipodal/peripheral displacement on textual scholarship, considered in itself or in comparison with other types of medieval materialities.

Please send submissions to
Roderick McDonald by 10 September, 2018.


If you would like to submit an expression of interest to host an AEMA-sponsored panel at a conference, or a symposium, study day, or round-table event, then please contact us here.
13th AEMA Conference, Invasion, Migration, Communication and Trade, 20-21 July, 2019, Flinders University, Adelaide
The 13th annual AEMA conference began very early on a chilly Friday morning in Adelaide, as various delegates made their way to the Bedford Park campus of Flinders University from various places both near and far. Our four morning sessions which opened proceedings featured a mix of Australian and International speakers speaking on topics ranging from the fifth to the thirteenth centuries, from Lithuania, via England and Scandinavia, to the lands of Byzantine Empire; but all connected to one another through their exploration of our conference theme of cultural exchange.
After a delicious lunch, and a well-attended AGM, we settled into the first of our keynote speakers, Professor Daniel Anlezark (University of Sydney), who spoke to us on 'Poetic Inter-Saxons, Literary Relations and Exchange between England and the Continent from the 8th to the 10th centuries'. After a quick break, we then left Bedford Park, and piled into two buses which took us to our special practical session at the State Library of South Australia, where the wonderful staff, led by the Library's Collection Development Librarian, Sara Stodart, had organised a special viewing of some of their rarest medieval manuscripts in the wonderful surrounds of the historic Jervois Room in the Mortlock Wing of the Library.
There were so many incredible manuscripts and fragments which we were privileged to view! AEMA members were even able to assist the Library with the identification of certain MSS, including that of an extract of Matthew, and explain the purpose of the 'hand mnemonic' in another. Many more images of the conference delegates engrossed in the Library's MSS can be found on AEMA's Twitter account, under the #AEMA2018 hashtag. 
After the Library, it was time to take ourselves to the Flinders city campus for the second of our plenary speakers, Professor Leonard Neidorf (Nanjing University), whose public keynote address, 'The Language of Hrothgar's Sermon and the Transmission of Beowulf' was a great conversation starter. After such a full day, the final event was the conference dinner at one of Adelaide's great Indian restaurants, Taj Tandoor, where we all enjoyed the wonderfully delicious food and the equally stimulating conversation!
Day two found us back at the city campus for the whole day, ready for another wonderful set of wide-ranging and stimulating papers on topics ranging from poetry, linguistics, archaeology, and Galla Placidia! As with the first day's programme, our speakers were a mix of postgraduates to established academics, both Australian and internationally-based. Our final session of the conference was our third keynote, Professor Andrew Lynch (University of Western Australia), who gave an engaging talk entitled 'Of Monks and Men: Charles Kingsley's Hereward the Wake (1866) and the Evolution of Englishness'. 

And just like that, another successful AEMA conference had come to an end as it had begun - with AEMA's President, Darius von Güttner-Sporzyński thanking all of our delegates, especially our plenary speakers and our international guests, our hosts Flinders University, our sponsors the Government of South Australia, Arts South Australia, and the Ian Potter Foundation, and of course our tireless 2018 conference convenors Erin Sebo and Janet Wade, as well as Erica Steiner and the rest of the AEMA Committee. Thank you to everyone who came to Adelaide and offered their diverse and fascinating research to an always-appreciative AEMA audience - and we hope to see you all again in 2019!
 
Erica Steiner
University of Sydney
End of year AEMA celebration!
This year, we would like to announce something new to AEMA: we will be organising a series of small informal gatherings for our members and supporters in each capital city during the holiday season this year. While no dates have been determined as yet, we would like to invite AEMA members to meet for an informal, social gathering to celebrate the year that's been, catch up on friendships, and so forth! We anticipate that each location will organise their own dates, to be held anywhere between late November and January.

Therefore, we will be seeking people to nominate as hosts or as organisers for these events. The demands will not be onerous, essentially a convivial meeting place for an afternoon/evening is all that is required. It could be a local cafe/restaurant, your favourite watering hole, or even the park. So if you would like to help the committee out by being such a host, then please
email us, and we'll start organising something within the next couple of months!
Membership Renewals
In 2017, the AEMA Committee unveiled the new, simplified, membership and payments system. It has allowed us to keep a better track of payments and members, and it means that you don’t have to re-enter your details every renewal or when you sign up for a conference. In addition to being able to pay for the conference here, back issues of JAEMA are also able to be purchased through this site.

If you have already renewed your 2018 AEMA membership - we thank you for your continued support! If, however, you are yet to do so, please visit the
membership portal and select the correct renewal option (Full or Concession) for 2018.

And don't forget that you can visit the membership portal at any time to check our upcoming events, or update your details if they have recently changed.

If you have any problems using the new system, then please email either our Vice-President,
Steve Joyce, or our Treasurer, John D'Alton, directly for assistance.
JAEMA
The Journal of the Australian Early Medieval Association (JAEMA) is an annual refereed, peer-reviewed journal devoted to the early medieval period. Submissions are invited on any topic of early medieval studies (from late antiquity and the end of the Roman Empire to about the end of the eleventh century).

JAEMA seeks engaging, original work that contributes to a collective understanding of the early medieval period. The journal welcomes papers on any theme, such as history, art history, archaeology, literature, linguistics, music and theology, and from any interpretive angle—memory, gender, historiography, medievalism, consilience and beyond.

Submissions are now being accepted for both JAEMA 2018 and2019, as well as future volumes, and we would especially invite contributions from members and others who attended and presented at this year's AEMA Conference in Adelaide. However, submissions from non-members and members alike are equally welcome, and may be made at any point during the year.

Articles must be written in English and 6,000–12,000 words, including footnotes and bibliography, and should follow the Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition). All submissions will be subject to double blind review, and all contributions to JAEMA may be submitted
here.

For any queries about submissions or the journal more generally, please contact our editor,
Geoffrey Dunn, or visit our website.
AEMA Member News
AEMA member Katherine Jacka and her partner Jakub Czastka welcomed their first daughter, Wanda Czastka, into the world on 5 January 2018.

On behalf of the AEMA Committee and the general AEMA membership, we would like to extend our warmest congratulations on the new addition to your family - and doubtless also to the future of medieval studies in Australia! 
Recent AEMA Graduates - Congratulations!
Stephen Joyce
PhD Awarded: January 2018
Institution: Monash University
Supervisors: Professor Constant Mews, Professor Megan Cassidy-Welch
Thesis Title: The Legacy of Gildas: Constructions of Authority in the Early Medieval West

Thesis Summary: Perceptions of the early medieval Christian culture of the British Isles have long been shaped by a sense that this culture evolved away from the episcopal structures of the continental Roman Church immediately after the fall of the Roman Empire. Within the limited sources that describe this ‘Celtic Christianity’, the Briton Gildas emerges as a significant figure of authority. In exploring the legacy of Gildas, this thesis demonstrates that the Christian culture of the British Isles in the early medieval period was neither idiosyncratic nor exceptional but, rather, connected to broader contestations over innovations in political and ecclesiastical authority in Western Europe. In doing so, Joyce argues that Gildas deserves to be seen as a significant contributor to the political development of the medieval West.

 

Have you recently successfully submitted your thesis and completed your degree? If so, then let us know by emailing the Newsletter Editor here to share the joy with your fellow AEMA members!
Recent AEMA Member Publications
AEMA member Shane McLeod has a new contribution to the History Scotland 'Expert Blog' series, Viking Scotland: Viking Burials on the Orkney Mainland. The article comprises a discussion of culturally Scandinavian Viking Age burial (and therefore funeral) sites in modern-day Scotland, with most of the burials dated to c. 850-950. The article also links to The Viking Burials in Scotland project blog page which began in 2015 and contains many more sites from across Scotland.

Further information is contained in the article itself, available
here.
AEMA member Penny Nash is one the contributing authors to Royal and Elite Households in Medieval and Early Modern Europe: More than Just a Castle, with her chapter entitled 'Maintaining Elite Households in Germany and Italy, 900-1115: Finances, Control, and Patronage'. The book itself brings a fresh approaches to the subject of royal and noble households in medieval and early modern Europe, with essays focussed on the people of the highest social rank: the nuclear and extended royal family, their household attendants, noblemen and noblewomen as courtiers, and physicians.

Further information on this volume is available
here.
AEMA member Shane McLeodis one of the contributing authors to Gender and Mobility in Scotland and Abroad, with his chapter entitled 'Gender and Mobility in Viking-Age Scotland'. The book itself explores gender and mobility from many different perspectives, tackling a broad time frame and international expanse, and is divided into three sections: geographic mobility, social mobility, and literature and mobility. 

Further information on this volume, and others in the series, is available
here.
Late antique Corinth was on the frontline of the radical political, economic and religious transformations that swept across the Mediterranean world from the second to sixth centuries CE. A strategic merchant city, it became a hugely important metropolis in Roman Greece and, later, a key focal point for early Christianity. In late antiquity, Corinthians recognised new Christian authorities; adopted novel rites of civic celebration and decoration; and destroyed, rebuilt and added to the city's ancient landscape and monuments. Drawing on evidence from ancient literary sources, extensive archaeological excavations and historical records, Amelia Brown here surveys this period of urban transformation, from the old Agora and temples to new churches and fortifications.

Further information on this volume, is available here.
Germano-Celtica: A Festschrift for Brian Taylor, edited by Anders Ahlqvist and Pamela O'Neill, truly is a celebration of the contribution of the now retired Associate Professor Taylor to the study of German at Sydney University specifically, and to the study of medieval and modern European history in Australia more broadly. This volume is also the most recent contribution to the Sydney Series in Celtic Studies, and it may be of interest that all of the previous volumes, as well as this latest one, are available to purchase.

Further information on this volume, and others in the series, is available
here.
Do you have a recently published a monograph or an edited volume? Let us know, by emailing the AEMA Newsletter Editor here, and we would be delighted to include your book in forthcoming issues of the AEMA Newsletter!
Upcoming Australian Events, Exhibitions and Seminars
Dr. James Kane will be presenting a talk for the Sydney Medieval and Renaissance Group (SMRG), entitled 'Pope Urban and the Origins of the Crusading Cross'.

The mass adoption of cloth crosses by the thousands of men and women who left western Europe at the end of the eleventh century to ‘liberate’ Jerusalem from Muslim domination was a striking development in the history of Christianity. Although scholars generally agree that this innovation was the brainchild of Pope Urban II (1088–1099) at the Council of Clermont in November 1095, they have rarely sought to explain the pontiff’s choice of the cross or his reasons for promoting it at that particular point in time. This talk begins to redress this neglect by examining the crusading cross in the light of Urban’s background as a Cluniac monk and by situating the symbol within the broader eleventh-century context of political tension, spiritual reform, and Christian expansion against Islam in the Iberian peninsula, Sicily, and the Maghreb.

The talk will be held at a SMRG member's house in Ultimo, 7pm, 12 September, 2018. To register your attendance for catering purposes and to obtain the address, please email
Lorna Barrow.
AEMA member Amy Wood will be presenting a talk for the Sydney Medieval and Renaissance Group (SMRG), entitled 'The Sclavenes: The Forgotten Barbarians Who Took over South-eastern Europe'; a people not overly well-known in Anglophone scholarship even though they gave rise to the important medieval kingdoms of the Balkans. Amy is a third-year PhD student at Macquarie University currently working in a thesis entitled 'From Anastasius to Heraclius: Late Roman and Early Byzantine Imperial Policy in Central and South-eastern Europe at the End of Antiquity' with a specific focus on the almost complete Roman evacuation of the region in the 620s.

The talk will be held at a SMRG member's house in Mosman, 7pm, 10 October, 2018. To register your attendance for catering purposes and to obtain the address, please email
Penny Nash.
Professor Zsuzsanna Gulácsi from the University of Northern Arizona will be presenting a talk for the Sydney University Studies in Religion Research Seminar Series entitled, 'Manichaean Art from Mesopotamia to China.

This lecture begins with Mani’s own engraved official seal from 3rd century Mesopotamia, followed by fragmentary copies of his canonical pictures from 10th century East Central Asia. Spectacular recent discoveries in Japanese collections provide us with the continuation of our survey: art produced by Chinese Manichaeans between the 12th and 15th centuries. The lecture includes the most recent depictions of Mani from Iran and Central Asia, where the legendary story of Mani, the pre-Islamic prophet and painter, was retold and illustrated as late as the 17th century.

The talk will be held at 4pm, 18 October, 2018, in the Rogers Room, Woolley Building, University of Sydney.
AEMA member Dr. Erin Sebo will be presenting a talk for the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Centre (CMRS) entitled 'Depictions of Early Medieval Grave Goods: Techniques for Using Literary Evidence in an Archaeological Context'.

The talk will be held at 3pm, 19 October, 2018, Room N602, Menzies Building, Monash University.
The Hellenic Museum in Melbourne, has a current exhibition entitled, Gods, Myths and Mortals: Greek Treasures Across the Millennia
 

Gods, Myths & Mortals brings 8,000 years of Greek civilisation to Melbourne – with each time period celebrating the continuity and transformation which have shaped the Greek world. The collection includes: Neolithic pottery; Cycladic statues; Minoan figurines; Mycenaean jewelry; Hellenistic sculptures; Byzantine icons and manuscripts; Post Byzantine secular art and costumes; and Neo-Hellenic art and weaponry, including ornate swords and pistols belonging to Greek revolutionary heroes Kolokotronis and Mavromichalis. All treasures are from the renowned Benaki Museum, Athens as part of an ongoing collaboration between our two museums. This exhibition is currently open, and will close 10 October 2019.

Australian School of Celtic Learning - Short Courses
Founded in December 2017 by AEMA's inaugural president, Dr Pamela O’Neill, the Australian School of Celtic Learning is a community-oriented educational venture. The school's vision is for a world where everyone has affordable and accessible opportunities to learn about the Celtic cultures.  It's aim is to present the latest and best research in the field of Celtic learning to all of our students, whether their interest is genealogical, spiritual, historical or linguistic.

The school's programmes are arranged in four terms each year, each beginning on one of the Celtic festivals of Imbolc, Bealtaine, Lughnasadh and Samhain.  It offers study days, evening courses, residential immersion schools and overseas study tours.  Topics for the programmes range widely over topics of Celtic interest, with a particular focus on the early medieval period, and on medieval and modern Celtic languages.


All of the short courses and study days (unless otherwise listed) are located at the Sydney Mechanics’ School of Arts, 280 Pitt Street, Sydney, and all course fees include the course booklets and suitable refreshments (morning tea, lunch, afternoon tea as applicable). Further information is available on the school website, or from Pamela directly. Listed below are the latest courses on offer at the School:
September:

Saint Ninian and Whithorn Study Day

A study day which will explore who Saint Ninian was as well as his mission to the southern Picts in the morning session, with a closer look at the monastic site of Whithorn in the afternoon session.
Saint Ninian Seminar: 10am-1pm, 8 September, 2018.
Whithorn Seminar: 2pm-5pm, 8 September, 2018.

$50 (full fee)/$35 (student/unwaged) for either session, or
$95 (full fee)/$65 (student/unwaged) for the full day package.

Irish Conversation for Beginners:
Learn how to hold simple conversations in the modern Irish language. A six-week course for beginners.
6.30-8.30pm, (Wednesdays) 19, 26 September, 3, 10, 17, 24 October, 2018.
$185 (full fee)/$125 (student/unwaged)
When taken along with the Introduction of Irish Language Course, the pair package (12 weeks) is $350 (full fee)/$230 (student/unwaged).

Adomnan of Iona Seminar
A morning session looking at the life and works of the key figure of Adomnan, including a close examination of his Law of Innocents. The Vernal Equinox Celebration follows.
9.30am-12.30pm, 22 September, 2018.
$50 (full fee)/$35 (student/unwaged)

Vernal Equinox Celebration
A light lunch, music, and a short talk about the history of the how the vernal equinox was and is celebrated in Celtic lands, as well as the launch of the Samhain calendar.
1-3pm, 22 September, 2018.
Free event, RSVP required for catering.


October:

Lord of the Rings Study Day

A discussion, and indeed celebration, of all things LOTR! Sessions will be divided into a study on Tolkein himself, on Hobbits and Anglo-Saxons, Elves and Celts, and Dwarves and Vikings.
10am-5pm, 6 October, 2018.
$95 (full fee)/$65 (student/unwaged)/$50 (school-aged student)

The Picts
Spend the learning about the Picts, and the sources for their history, language and material culture.
Who were the Picts Seminar: 10am-1pm, 20 October, 2018.
Pictish Carved Stones Seminar: 2pm-5pm, 20 October, 2018.
$50 (full fee)/$35 (student/unwaged) for either session, or
$95 (full fee)/$65 (student/unwaged) for the full day package.

 
Other Short Courses - Australia and International
A Journey through Western Christianity: from Persecuted Faith to Global Religion (200-1650) is an online course offered through the Coursera MOOC platform, and is taught by Professor Bruce Gordon, of Yale University. This course traces the development of Western Christianity from its early persecution under the Roman Empire in the third century to its global expansion with the Jesuits of the early modern world. The course duration is 11 weeks, although flexible arrangements are available if more time is required. The start date is flexible and the cost is €45.00.

Further information is available on the
website.
The Cyprus Institute, with support through the Getty Foundation’s Connecting Art Histories initiative, is launching a new research seminar project: Mediterranean Palimpsests: Connecting the Art and Architectural Histories of Medieval and Early Modern Cities. Directed by Nikolas Bakirtzis (The Cyprus Institute) and D. Fairchild Ruggles (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), the project investigates the layered art histories of medieval Mediterranean cities as the basis for scholarly connections that challenge and move beyond the boundaries of modern historiographies, national narratives and contemporary socioeconomic realities.

The project’s directors will convene three research seminars that will engage expert advisors and selected emerging scholars, that will explore transition, appropriation and identity in art and architectural history; these will be ten-day programs held in Granada and Cordoba, January, 2019; and Rhodes and Thessaloniki, May 2019. Scholars and researchers who received their PhD in or after 2008 (i.e. within past 10 years) in the fields of art history, architectural history, landscape history, and archaeology are eligible to apply. Scholars must be willing and able to participate in all three workshops. The program provides travel and lodging costs and museum entrance fees for participating scholars.

Further information is available on the
website.
The Irish Archaeology Field School (IAFS), Ireland’s leading provider of accredited, field-based archaeological research and training, is again providing a number of credited and uncredited programs (as well as eight-week long internships) for novice and experienced students in archaeology. While their programs are excavation-centered and aimed primarily at students of archaeology, anthropology and history, these courses are open to all interested students and researchers. These four-week programs include tuition, credit transcript (for some courses), accommodation and meals, equipment and field trips. International travel and local transfers are not included. The following IAFS excavation programmes will be offered in 2019:

The Medieval Landscape of Ferrycarrig: Tracing the Anglo-Norman Invasion of Ireland, will be held as both Winter and Summer courses, 6 January - 2 February 2019, and 14 July - 10 August 2019. Built in 1169 CE, Ferrycarrig is crucial to our understanding of the earliest stages of the Anglo-Norman invasion of Ireland. Students will be exposed not only to archaeological investigation at the site but also to the many and myriad ways by which the public is presented, view and interpret the archaeological record.

Archaeology and Environment in Ireland: The Environmental and Cultural Heritage of the Irish Landscape, will be held in July 2019. This unique teaching focused program has been designed to give students an in-depth understanding of the natural landscape, from the underlying bedrock to the glacial landforms, from the overlying soils to the flora and fauna they support. The program combines field studies with laboratory work to piece together three different landscapes in three distinct locations. 

Other courses are offered jointly with the National University of Ireland Maynooth, are shorter one and two week intensive programmes, and in 2019 the following will be offered:

Forensic Anthropology: Dead Men Do Tell Tales, will be held 10-16 March, 2019, and 9-15 June, 2019. This one week  program teaches students how to excavate and assess human remains in the surroundings of the Irish National Heritage Park located in Wexford on Ireland’s south-east coast. The course is designed for students from a variety of academic backgrounds with an interest in osteoarchaeology and physical/forensic anthropology.

Uncovering the Archaeology of Conflict and Colonisation will be held 23 June - 6 July, 2019. This two week summer school program gives students a hands-on orientation of archaeological field techniques and field anthropology, including archaeological survey, archaeological excavation, experimental archaeology and post-excavation analysis.

Further information is available on the
website.
The Macquarie Ancient Languages School (MALS) which began in 1981 as an intensive summer school in ancient Greek, has expanded over the years and now offers courses in a variety of ancient languages associated with the teaching and research programs of the Department of Ancient History at Macquarie University. MALS offers intensive courses at introductory to advanced levels led by our team of enthusiastic tutors, some of whom have been sharing their skills and passion for languages at the School for many years. Week-long sessions run on the Macquarie campus in January and July each year. We specialise in Greek, Egyptian, Latin (winter only), Coptic, and Hebrew, and regularly include other languages as well. Everyone (from 16 years of age up) interested in exploring one of these languages with us is warmly welcomed.

Summer Week 2019 will be held 7-11 January, 2019.
Winter Week 2019 will be held 8-12 July, 2019.

Further information is available on the
website.
InScribe is a free online course in palaeography at the Institute of Historical Research, University of London. This course provides scholars and the general public interested in medieval books and documents with online training on the diverse areas found within palaeography. Topics covered include general palaeography, the history of medieval scripts, diplomatic, codicology and illumination. This distance learning module is aimed at filling this void as a complement to other traditional methods of palaeographical training. Its purpose is to provide the necessary training required by non-specialists to allow them to explore and interact with medieval manuscripts and documents. Thus, after an introductory (free) module presenting general palaeographical topics and an overall view of the evolution of script in the medieval period, you will be able to undertake one of four advanced modules (or pathways) to further your knowledge within the different areas of palaeography and manuscript studies.

Further information is available on the
website.
Classical and Medieval Languages Reading Groups
Classical Greek
Melbourne:

Tuesdays, 11am, weekly.
Classics and Archaeology Library, Old Quadrangle Building, University of Melbourne.
Contact:
Marc Bonaventura.

 


Classical Latin
Melbourne:

Wednesdays, 3.30pm, weekly.
Classics and Archaeology Library, Old Quadrangle Building, University of Melbourne.
Contact:
Marc Bonaventura.

Melbourne:
Fridays, 11am, weekly (in term).
Room N802(Menzies Building), Monash University
Contact:
CMRS Postgraduate Committee.

 


Koine Greek
Melbourne:

Mondays, 11am, weekly.
Room 502, Arts West Building, University of Melbourne.
Contact:
Darryl Palmer.

 


Medieval Greek
Melbourne:

Wednesdays, 5.15pm, weekly.
Arts West NW room 651, University of Melbourne.
Contact:
Roger Scott and John Burke.

 


Medieval Latin
Melbourne:

Thursdays, 12.30pm, fortnightly.
Project Room 1, Baillieu Library, University of Melbourne.
Contact:
John Weretka.

 


Middle English
Melbourne:
Mondays, 11am, weekly.
Room 624, 757 Swanston St (Building 199), University of Melbourne.
Contact:
Andrew Stephenson

 


Middle Welsh:
Sydney:
(Group currently on hiatus - please email for details on when it will resume)
Nag's Head Hotel, Glebe.
Contact:
Pamela O'Neill.

 


Old English:
Canberra:
Thursdays, 1pm, weekly (during Uni term).
Baldessin Precinct Building, ANU.
Contact:
Cynthia Allen.

Melbourne:
Tuesdays, 2pm, weekly.
Room 202, John Medley Building, University of Melbourne.
Contact:
Robert DiNapoli

Sydney:
Mondays, 6pm, fortnightly.
Nag's Head Hotel, Glebe.
Contact:
Anna Wallace.
 


Old French
Melbourne:
Mondays, 5pm, fortnightly.
Room 511, Babel (Building 139), University of Melbourne.
Contact:
Stephanie Downes and Véronique Duché.

Sydney:
Jordan Church is seeking people who might be interested in an Old French Learners’ Group. Note that emphasis falls on ‘learners’, though of course, anyone proficient in Old French would be more than welcome to join - we would greatly appreciate any guidance!
Contact:
Jordan Church

 


Old Irish:
Sydney:
Tuesdays, 6.30pm, weekly.
Madison Hotel, Central.
Contact:
Pamela O'Neill.

 


Old Norse:
Sydney:
(A beginner's course in Old Norse is also available - please email for more details)
Thursdays, 12pm, weekly.
S334, Woolley Building, Sydney Uni.
Contact:
Robert Cutrer.

 

Is your medieval language reading group missing from this list? Or would you like to start one of your own? Then let us know, by emailing the AEMA Newsletter Editor here, and we would be delighted to include a notice of your group in forthcoming issues of the AEMA Newsletter!
Upcoming Conferences and Symposia - Australia and New Zealand
Faking It: Manuscripts from the Margins, will be held at the Australian Hearing Hub, Level 1 Lecture Theatre, Macquarie University, 22 September, 2018.

When it comes to the past, wherever truth matters, fakes abound. The creation, distortion, manipulation, or reconstitution of information shapes our experience of the world at every level. The growing sophistication of technology seems to have amplified rather than solved the problem. Telling ‘real’ from ‘fake’, ‘true’ from ‘false’, ‘original’ from ‘copy’ is not simply a dilemma of modern information technology, but a crisis of history, which haunts every vehicle we use to exemplify and affirm ‘facts’ about the world. This public event brings together eleven international and local experts to present diverse perspectives on forgery, including discussions of fake texts on stone, papyrus, parchment, and paper, the effect of fakes on antiquities markets and scholarship, and the relationship between fake, copy, and replica in the digital age. From the Book of the Dead to the Dead Sea Scrolls, via inscriptions, papyri, charters, letters, and other texts from the ancient to early modern world, this event will examine the importance of forgeries for the way we assess and communicate history, and how they effect our view of both the past and the present.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

The fourth conference of the Australasian Association for Digital Humanities, Making Connections, will be held at the University of South Australia, 25-28 September, 2018.

The conference will explore how the Digital Humanities enhance our ability to make connections between disciplines, sectors, countries, ways of thinking, people and possibilities. Sessions will focus on praxis and innovation across the international scene, with emphasis on local and regional communities of practice in Australasia and the Pacific. Together, delegates will explore how academics can use data and digital tools to tackle real world challenges in partnership with collecting organisations, industry, government and communities.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

The annual conference of the Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group and the UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Skin in Medieval and Early Modern Worlds, will be held at the University of Western Australia, 13 October, 2018.

Skin as a material served a vital role in pre-modern economies. It was an essential ingredient in clothing and tools, and it formed the primary material for the manuscripts on which knowledge and ideas were recorded and preserved. Beyond the many uses for the skins of animals, the idea of skin interested artists, scholars, and theologians. As a boundary or surface, skin presented a range of symbolic possibilities. We are interested in papers that address the many pre-modern uses of skin, as well representations of and ideas about skin.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

Religion and Emotion in Medieval and Early Modern Europe, c.1100-1800, will be held at the University of Adelaide, 22-23 November, 2018.

In the medieval and early modern world, religious belief and practices were expressed with passionate commitment out of an emotional attachment to the divine. Institutional religion cultivated and prescribed certain emotions and emotional styles, through media such as literature, sermons, rituals and art. This one-day symposium seeks to explore the emotional dimensions of both institutional and individual religious belief, experience and practice, as well as the relationships between them. It aims to bring together scholars already working on emotions, and those interested in exploring how a focus on emotion may enhance their research on medieval and early modern religion, broadly conceived.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

The 23rd Australasian Conference of Irish Studies will be held at the University of Sydney, 27-30 November, 2018.

We envisage the theme of ‘memory and myth’ as capturing debates in both modern and medieval Irish Studies. Our conference occurs at the centenary of a period of change in Ireland, during which were born new narratives of 1916-both as triumph and defeat. There were increasingly conflicted memories of WW1. The cultural life that surrounded the changing political scene included many revivals of imagery from the a distant, sometimes mythological, past, with a renewed investment in Celtic art, language and literature.

Papers on these themes will be especially welcomed, but contributions will be considered on any theme of Irish history, literature,Irish language,archaeology, music,religion, sport, cultural studies, literature, music, dance, drama, etc. In light of the hosting of the conference by the Celtic Studies Programme at Sydney we would be very glad to welcome contributions on medieval and Irish-language topics. An Irish-medium Tionól and a symposium on the Irish-Australian art of the Melocco Brothers will also accompany the conference.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

Preceding ANZAMEMS 2019 itself, there are two PATS strands available, Digital Editing and the Medieval & Early Modern Manuscript, and Doing Digital Humanities: From Project Planning to Digital Delivery. Both strands will also take place at the the University of Sydney, 4-5 February, 2019.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

The Twelfth Biennial ANZAMEMS: Conference,  Categories, Boundaries, Horizons, will be held at the University of Sydney, 5-8 February, 2019.

Categories and boundaries help us to define our fields of knowledge and subjects of inquiry, but can also contain and limit our perspectives. The concept of category emerges etymologically from the experience of speaking in an assembly, a dialogic forum in which new ways of explaining can emerge. Boundaries and horizons are intertwined in their meanings, pointing to the limits of subjectivity, and inviting investigation beyond current understanding into new ways of connecting experience and knowledge.

In addition to the two AEMA sponsored panels, there are a number of other panel sessions which may be of interest including:
Boundaries of the Law - further information
here.
Crusades: Categories, Boundaries and Horizons - further information
here.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

The Australasian Society for Classical Studies will hold their annual conference at the University of New England, 4-7 February, 2019.

Further information will be available on the
conference website.

 

The 20th AABS conference, Dissidence and Persecution in Byzantium, will be held at Macquarie University, 19-20 July, 2019.

Further information is available on the
conference website.
Upcoming Conferences and Symposia - International
Leprosy and the 'Leper' Reconsidered, will be held at McGill University, Montreal, Canada, 20-22 September, 2018.

This is an interdisciplinary and trans-historical conference which seeks both to unite and to broaden the discourse on leprosy sufferers and leprosy. In this way, this conference aims to highlight and discuss the presence of leprosy not only across time, but also across physical borders and spaces. Indeed, this conference aims to erase such boundaries in order to foster a more encompassing discussion of such a global disease. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, there is a growing need to address leprosy within an interdisciplinary framework in order to expand our understanding of changing discourse, medical, social, and popular popular, surrounding the disease and the afflicted.

Further information is available on the
conference website
 

The 24th biennial conference of the Southern African Society for Medieval and Renaissance Studies (SASMARS), will be held at Mont Fleur in Stellenbosch, South Africa, 23-26 August, 2018.

Medieval and early modern societies weathered various socio-cultural changes, including religious, economic, and political transformations, across a range of different geographies and in both urban and rural spaces. We seek papers from any applicable discipline that explore ancestry and memory within a variety of geographic locales in the medieval and/or early modern eras. We shall welcome broad and imaginative interpretations of “ancestry” and “memory”.

Further information is available from the conference convenor,
Retha Knoetze.
 

The 10th Celtic Linguistics Conference will be held at Maynooth University, Maynooth, Kildare, Ireland, 4-5 September, 2018.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

Winckelmann's Victims: The Classics: Norms, Exclusions and Prejudices will be held Ghent University, Belgium, 20-22 September, 2018.

Since the Carolingian period, notably ‘classical’ literature has served as a constant source and model of creativity and inspiration, by which the literary identity of Europe has been negotiated and (re-)defined. At the same time, this orientation and fascination towards the classics throughout literary history has often —implicitly or explicitly— gone hand in hand with the cultivation of a certain normativity. Almost inevitably, this normativity has implied, shaped and fed prejudices and thoughts of exclusion towards literary features and aesthetic characteristics that seemed to deviate from classical ideals.

Further information is available on the
conference website.
 

Medievalism, Public History and Academia: the Re-creation of Early Medieval Europe, c. 400-1000, will be held at Malmö University, 26-28 September, 2018.

For many, history can be described as a living thing: current events are said to “make history”; new discoveries of documents or artefacts are said to re-write history, while many people are engaged in re-creating and reconstructing events and objects from the past. This conference aims to bring together those scholars and reenactors who engage or wish to engage with the juxtaposition of academic history, public history, and re-enacted or reconstructed history. The overarching thematic focus of this conference will engage with the question of historical authenticity and authority using a critical heritage approach.

Further information is available on the
conference website.
 

The 44th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference will be held in San Antonio, Texas, 4-7 October, 2018.

The BSC is the annual forum for the presentation and discussion of papers on every aspect of Byzantine Studies and is open to all, regardless of nationality or academic status. It is also the occasion of the annual meeting of the Byzantine Studies Association of North America (BSANA)

Further information is available on the
conference website.
 

Boundary Crossings, the International Society for the Study of Medievalism (ISSM) conference will be held at Brock University, Ontario, 12-13 October, 2018.

Plenary sessions will cross disciplinary boundaries by investigating similarities in concerns, methods, and themes between the fields of (neo)medievalism(s) and the Neo-Victorian. For regular conference sessions, proposals are invited on the conference theme. Papers might address the ways in which medievalism crosses the boundaries of, or is used to interrogate various boundaries.

Further information is available on the
conference website.
 

Re-Reading Hebrew Scripture: Old Testament Cycles in Medieval Wall Painting will be held at the University of Milan, Italy, 16-18 October, 2018.

This is an international conference concerning the Old Testament narrative in medieval wall painting, with four thematic sessions: Early Christian Pictorial Tradition and Early Middle Ages; the Thematic and Narrative Development in the Romanesque Period; Old Testament Cycles and Multi-layered Meaning; and the Role of Patriarchs, Judges, Prophets and Kings. Papers may presented in English, Italian or French.

Further information is available on the
conference website.
 

Medieval Unfreedoms: Slavery, Servitude and Trafficking in Humans before the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, will be held at Birmingham University, New York, 19-20 October, 2018.

Across the medieval world (c. 500 — c. 1500), multiple forms and degrees of 'unfreedom'—slavery, serfdom, forced concubinage, coerced labor, captivity, and bondage—co-existed. Slaves and other unfree people made crucial, but often obscured, marks on societies that accorded them varying degrees of power even as they constrained and exploited them. Trade in humans tied together distinct cultural zones, religions, and geographic regions. Shifting definitions of freedom and 'unfreedom' shaped evolving social systems, and helped to shape developing concepts of race, ethnicity, social status, and cultural difference.

Further information is available on the
conference website.
 

The 28th Annual Texas Medieval Association (TEMA) Conference will be held at Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas, 25-27 October, 2018.

TEMA welcomes papers on all aspects of medieval and renaissance studies. 

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

The North American Conference on British Studies Annual Meeting will be held in Providence, Rhode Island, 25-28 October, 2018.

The NACBS and its affiliate, the Northeast Conference on British Studies, seek participation by scholars in all areas of British Studies for the 2018 meeting. We solicit proposals for presentations on Britain, the British Empire, and the British world, including topics relating to component parts of Britain and on British influence (or vice versa) in Ireland, the Commonwealth, and former colonies in Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean (etc.) Our interests range from the medieval to the modern.

Further information is available on the
conference website.
 

The 37th International Conference of the Haskins Society will be held at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, 26-28 October, 2018.

The Haskins Society invites submission of proposals on all areas of the Society’s interests.  These include - but are not limited to - Anglo-Saxon, Anglo-Norman, Viking, Plantagenet, and Capetian periods and regions.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

The Medieval Legal History Workshop, which precedes the 48th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Legal History, will be held at the Houston Hilton, Houston, Texas, 7-8 November, 2018.

The Medieval Legal History Workshop aims to present the work of a number of scholars of medieval law and society who are new to the ASLH’s annual meeting. As such, we encourage applications from PhD students, postdocs and VAPs who work on or with law in the late antique and medieval periods in its political, social, and cultural aspects and who have not traditionally attended the society’s meetings. We notably encourage applications from any legal tradition of the period, including (among others) Byzantine, Canon, Chinese, Islamic, or Jewish law.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

Diaspora: Identity, Migration, and Return will be held at the University of the Bahamas, 8-10 November, 2018.

We invite individual submissions and panels from all disciplines exploring the concept of diaspora in the Middle Ages, interpreted broadly. We also welcome papers that consider how migration affects the concept of nationhood; conquest, exile, and colonisation; economic migration; the pursuit of educational, religious, cultural, or geographical identity; or any related topic.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

The Society for Medieval Archaeology 2018 Student Colloqium will be held at the University of Reading, 9-11 November, 2018.

The general theme of the event will centre on avenues of interdisciplinary research which benefit medieval archaeology therefore we encourage papers from a broad range of subject areas with links to archaeology. Papers from across the medieval period and all geographical areas are welcomed.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

The 116th Annual Pacific Ancient and Modern language Association (PAMLA) Conference will be held at Western Washington University, Bellingham, Washington, USA, 9-11 November, 2018.

Should you wish to engage with the conference theme, consider exploring such topics as acting as art and metaphor, theories of role play and theatricality, and conceptions of the world stage and the public audience. Papers at the conference, however, are not required to engage the conference theme, and many sessions do not touch on the theme at all.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

Government and Governance from Late Antiquity to the Renaissance: Representation and Reality will be held at the University of New Hampshire, Durham, USA, 17 November, 2018.

The New England Medieval Consortium seeks abstracts for papers that consider questions and problems inherent in organising sophisticated societies from late antiquity through the Renaissance. Submissions are welcome from all fields of scholarly study including but not limited to history, literature, philosophy, theology, numismatics, art history, and manuscript studies. Government and governance are understood for the purposes of this conference to include all aspects of human organisation from neighbourhood associations and guilds to kingdoms and empires, and from parishes and priories to the papacy. Possible areas of inquiry include corruption, patronage, ethics, reform, institutional structures, bureaucracy, propaganda, jurisdiction, rights, and obligations.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

The Middle Ages in the Modern World  will be hosted by John Cabot University and the Ecole Française de Rome, and held in Rome, Italy, 21-24 November, 2018.

The Middle Ages in the Modern World is a biennial conference about the ways in which the Middle Ages have been received, imagined, invoked, relived, used, abused, and refashioned in the modern and contemporary worlds. Proposals for twenty-minute papers pertinent to medievalism in all parts of the world are warmly welcome, as are planned panels of three twenty-minute papers each. Proposals and papers may be presented in English, Italian, or French. The conference especially invites papers on Comparative Medievalisms and Reliving the Middle Ages.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

The First International Congress of Augustinian Studies, Augustine and the contemporary Philosophers, will be held in Santiago, Chile, 22-23 November, 2018.

Sponsored by the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, the University of Chile, the University of the Andes, the Augustinian Library of Buenos Aires, and The Center of Medieval Studies, the First International Congress of Augustinian studies will focus on the philosophy, of Saint Augustine and his influence in contemporary philosophers, and feature with national and international distinguished scholars.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

The inaugural Trinity HistoryCon will be held at Trinity College, Dublin, 30 November, 2018.

HistoryCon is an interdisciplinary event celebrating the relationship between popular media and academic research. This year’s theme is “Who tells your story?” and will focus on the connection between historical research and a personal relationship with popular media. HistoryCon invites abstracts examining the connection between any popular media and any aspect of history from Antiquity to the Enlightenment. Presentations should connect historical research to a widely accessible and noteworthy film, television show, book, or comic. They should be suitable for a mixed audience of ages 12 and up. Historical costumes and cosplay are welcome at HistoryCon.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

The 2nd Annual International Graduate Edinburgh Byzantine Conference, Reception, Appropriation and Innovation: Byzantium between the Christian and Islamic worlds, will be held at the University of Edinburgh, 30 November - 1 December, 2018.

The key theme of this conference is dialogue – dialogue between Byzantium and its neighbouring cultures. The conference will explore all three of the fundamental modes of dialogue and discourse (reception, appropriation and innovation) between Byzantium and its neighbours during any time period from the 5th-15th c. We strongly encourage papers highlighting exchange in both directions, Byzantium receiving from other cultures and/or others receiving from Byzantium.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

The 26th Biennial Conference of the Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program of Barnard College, Truth and Truthiness: Belief, Authenticity, Rhetoric, and Spin in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, will be held at Columbia University, New York, 1 December, 2018.

The capacity of language both to communicate truth and to manipulate perceptions of it was as vexed a problem for the Middle Ages and Renaissance as it is today. From Augustine to Erasmus, enthusiasm for the study of rhetoric was accompanied by profound concern about its capacity to mask the difference between authenticity and deceit, revelation and heresy, truth and truthiness. In our current era when public figures aim to create effects of immediacy and authenticity, this conference looks at the history of debates about rhetoric and, more generally, about the presentation of transparency and truthfulness.

Further information is available on the
conference website.
 

Weaving War: New Perspectives on violence and society in the Viking Age will be held at the Centre for Viking Age Studies (ViS), University of Oslo, 12-14 December, 2018.

Violence, warfare and warrior ideology are seen as vital components in understanding Viking society, and the many facets of a warrior society appear through landscapes, material culture, religion, poetry, and in traces of ritualised actions and gendered practices. Warfare also presents ambiguities: Weapons were instruments for terror and murder, but they also formed the basis for identity and self-esteem. As scholars we regularly encounter the public perception of the violent Viking, calling also for reflection on the ways in which Viking violence and wars feed back into public dissemination and the present Viking fascination.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

TAG Deva, the 40th annual Theoretical Archaeology Group Conference will be held at the University of Chester, UK, 17-19 December, 2018.

TAG Deva invites and encourages a range of theoretical topics, ideas, and debates, accepting the breadth and diversity of current archaeological theory. However, TAG Deva still aims to encapsulate the distinctive prehistory and history of Chester and its region. So sessions on subjects relating to frontiers and mobilities in terms of time and space, land and sea, will be especially welcome in the context of Chester as an historic border city between England and Wales.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

The 2019 Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, Gender and Aliens, will be held at Durham University, 7-10 January, 2019.

In recent years discourse around ‘aliens’, as migrants living in modern nation-states, has been highly polarised, and the status of people who are technically termed legal or illegal aliens by the governments of those states has often been hotly contested. It is evident from studies of the past, however, that the movement of people is not a recent phenomenon: in the medieval west, one of the Latin terms applied to such people was alieni (‘foreigners’, or‘strangers’),and it is clear from the surviving evidence that there were many people in the Middle Ages who could be, and indeed were, identified as aliens. This conference aims to stimulate debate about the ways in which gender intersected with and related to the idea of such aliens – and, more broadly, alienation – in the medieval world.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

Researching, Teaching, and Learning the Middle Ages through Popular Culture: Medievalism and All That will be held at Université Grenoble Alpes, France, 17-18 January, 2019.

Throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, literary medievalism has known a growing popularity, and new media and forms of entertainment have been progressively involved in various forms of recollection – whether celebrating or deprecating, or simply reinterpreting – of the Middle Ages. These various appropriations have brought about a complex array of medieval revivals that are often influenced by technological developments and interactive media. This conference seeks to explore these particular forms of contemporary medievalism.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

The 14th Annual Marco Manuscript Workshop will be held at International House, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, 1-2 February 2019.

The workshop is organised by Professors Maura K. Lafferty (Classics) and Roy M. Liuzza (English), and is hosted by the Marco Institute for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, with support from the Department of English and the Office of Research.

This year’s workshop explores the theme “Bits and Pieces.” Some manuscripts have survived the centuries bright, pristine, majestic, and complete; most have suffered at least some minor damage or loss; some manuscripts, however, seem no more than ragged scraps. They lack beginnings, or endings, or middles; they tantalise with their incompleteness. These fragments still have much to tell us, though they might make us work to learn it.

Further information is available on the conference website.
 

The 11th Annual Medievalists@Penn Conference, Mediocrity in the Middle Ages, will be held at the University of Pennsylvania, 22 February, 2019.

What makes something “mediocre” in the Middle Ages? We often assume that if a manuscript, literary text, or work of visual or performance art has survived from the medieval period, it is exceptional in some way. Modern scholarship tends to enforce this assumption by either praising a work for its beauty and importance, or arguing for the centrality and exceptionality of something that past scholarship has ignored. Resisting the notion that any texts surviving from the Middle Ages are likely exceptional in some way, this conference seeks to examine unexceptional artistic productions in the Middle Ages, to consider what we can learn from medial texts and artefacts, and to critically assess the metrics by which we evaluate quality.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

Invenire: Discovery and Innovation in pre-modern Scandinavia will be held the University of California, Berkeley, 22-23 February, 2019.

“Invention” resonates in our modern world as a creative process. The term’s Latin root invenīre, however, speaks to a medieval and early modern past that conceived of innovation as an unearthing of the past. This conference aims to explore inventions as both process and product in Scandinavia before 1800. Broadly defined, these conceptions may include technological advancements, the navigation of global landscapes, cartography and spatial knowledge, economic networks, religious and political thought, history of the book, the reception of architectural and artistic modes, and cosmology.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

Stakes of Sanctuary Workshop will be held at McGill University, Quebec, Canada, 7-8 March, 2019.

In recent decades, there has been a great deal of attention given to modern sanctuary practices, but a quick glance at the historical record reveals the multitude of ways in which sanctuary practices have manifested themselves, the ways they have been justified, as well as the ways in which they have been woven into the very fabric of human life. One can look to ideas in Ancient Greece and Rome, to the Old and New Testament and a sense of obligations to strangers as well as the Islamic tradition of istijara (to be one’s neighbour), to Medieval practices designed to offer the guilty time to make amends, to refuge among Indigenous communities (17th century Iroquois Wars), to protection for slaves via the Underground Railway and more recent state-sanctioned offers of refuge (via resettlement programs) and semi-authorized refuge in the form of sanctuary cities as well as individual acts of sanctuary.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

The 94th Annual Meeting of the Medieval Academy of America will be held at the University of Pennsylvania, 7-9 March, 2019.

Medievalists across various disciplines are taking a more geographically and methodologically global approach to the study of the Middle Ages. While the Organizing Committee invites proposals for papers on all topics and in all disciplines and periods of medieval studies, this year’s conference spotlights the “global turn” in medieval studies. To this end, we encourage session and paper proposals that treat the Middle Ages as a broad historical and cultural phenomenon, encompassing the full extent of Europe as well as the Middle East, southern and eastern Asia, Africa, and beyond. 

Further information is available on the
conference website.
 

The 13th Biennial meeting of Shifting Frontiers in Late Antiquity, Communal Responses to Local Disaster: Economic, Environmental, Political, Religious, will be held at Claremont McKenna College, California, 14-17 March, 2019.

The 2019 meeting will examine the impact of disasters on late-antique communities, including their susceptibility to disaster, the means by which they coped, and factors that increased resilience and facilitated recovery from disasters. In order to foster the thematic breadth and interdisciplinary perspective for which Shifting Frontiers is known, we invite papers concerned with the full range of traumatic events, and also long-term processes, that could distress communities: economic, environmental, political and religious.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

Ritual and Religion in the Medieval World, the 39th Annual Conference of the Center for Medieval Studies will be held Fordham University, New York, 30-31 March, 2019.

Long regarded as among the most esoteric and static aspects of pre-modern civilisations, religious ritual is now the focus of probing and evocative studies of medieval governmental, social, intellectual, spiritual, and domestic life. This conference seeks to continue widening the conversation about ritual and religion in the medieval world by bringing into dialogue contributions from across several religious traditions, including Christianity, Islam, and Judaism.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

IONA: Seafaring: Early Medieval Studies on the Islands of the North Atlantic: transformative networks, skills, theories, and methods for the future of the field, will be held at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada, 11-13, April 2019.

IONA: Seafaring is a three-day international conference on the islands of the North Atlantic that brings together scholars of early medieval Ireland, Britain, and Scandinavia to imagine cooperative, interdisciplinary futures for the study of North Atlantic archipelagos during the early medieval period. Designed less around traditional conference presentations and more as a “workspace,” it is designed to provide time and space for nascent and developing work, intellectual risk-taking, collaboration and cooperation. With its non-traditional formats and inclusive experimental approaches, IONA: Seafaring aims to forge reciprocal connections between artists and scholars in contemporary art and poetics, indigenous studies, and new media, broadening, complicating, and enriching those fields in counterpoint to academic work in early medieval North Atlantic studies.

Further information is available on the
conference website, and please note that each session has its own CFP, available here.
 

The Forty-Fifth Annual Sewanee Medieval Colloquium, Lives and Afterlifes, will be held at The University of the South, Sewanee, Tennessee, 12-13 April, 2019.

Applicants are invited to apply to the general or to specific sub-themes including, but not limited to: papers exploring accounts of the lives, deaths, and afterlives of medieval holy figures; the lives and afterlives of sacred spaces; and presentations that analyse quantitative thinking performed with geometry, astronomy, alchemy, or medicine, and investigate the myriad ways medieval measures signify within broader cultural contexts. 

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

Othello's Island 2019, the 7th Annual Conference of Medieval, Renaissance and Early Modern Studies, will be held at the Centre for Visual Arts and Research (CVAR) in Nicosia, Cyprus, 15-17 April, 2019.

The three main themes of the conference are: Medieval and Byzantine Art and Literature, Shakespeare and his Contemporaries, and Early Modern Women Writers, though papers on all aspects of the medieval are welcomed.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

The 54th International Congress on Medieval Studies will be held at the Medieval Institute at Western Michigan University, 9-12 May, 2019.

The congress features more than 550 sessions of papers, panel discussions, roundtables, workshops and performances. There are also some 100 business meetings and receptions sponsored by learned societies, associations and institutions. The exhibits hall boasts nearly 70 exhibitors, including publishers, used book dealers and purveyors of medieval sundries.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

A Workshop on Medieval Germany will be held at the German Historical Institute London, 17 May, 2019.
 

Organised by the German Historical Institute London in co-operation with the German Historical Institute Washington and the German History Society, this one-day workshop on Medieval Germany will provide an opportunity for researchers in the field from the UK, continental Europe, and the USA to meet in a relaxed and friendly setting and to learn more about each other’s work. Proposals for short papers are invited from researchers at all career stages with an interest in any aspect of the history of medieval Germany (generously defined). 

Further information is available on the conference website.
 

The 26th International Medieval Congress will be held at the University of Leeds, 1-4 July, 2019.

The IMC provides an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of all aspects of Medieval Studies. Proposals on any topic related to the Middle Ages are welcome, while every year the IMC also chooses a special thematic focus. In 2019 this is 'Materialities'.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

The 2019 British Legal History Conference, Comparative Legal History, will be held at the University of St Andrews, 10-13 July 2019.

The aim is to examine differences and similarities across a broad time-period to produce better approaches to the subject of legal history, combining depth of analysis with historical contextualisation. Rather than comparing individual rules or searching for universal systems, the theme will take an intermediate approach the topic of comparative law, investigating patterns in legal norms, processes, and practice. We welcome proposals from historians in all fields of legal history, whether doctrinal or contextual, domestic or transnational. Proposals which inform our understanding of the Common Law through comparison with other legal systems (e.g. civil or canon) as well as geographical comparisons are particularly welcome.

Further information is available on the conference website.
 

The 5th Forum Medieval Art will be held in Bern, Switzerland, 18-21 September, 2019.

The theme for the 5th Forum Medieval Art is ‘Peaks, Ponti & Passages’. Bern—looking out to peaks Eiger, Mönch, and Jungfrau, situated at the border to the Romandy, and having a long-standing tradition in bridge-building—embodies certain notions of translations, entanglements, and interactions. The conference will highlight such themes, focusing on forms and means of exchange, infrastructure, political and religious relationships, and the concrete reflections of these connections through objects. Methodological challenges will also be paramount, such as questioning how to write a history of encounters between artists, artworks, materials, and traditions.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

Emotions in Conflict, The Second Biennial Conference of the Society for the History of Emotions, will be held at the University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, 2-4 October, 2019.

The Society for the History of Emotions (SHE) is an international and interdisciplinary professional organisation. SHE promotes a deeper understanding of the changing meanings and consequences of emotional concepts, expressions and regulation over time and space and across cultures. The Society is committed to fostering interdisciplinary international dialogue on all aspects of humanities-based emotions research.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

The 29th Annual Texas Medieval Association (TEMA) Conference will be held at Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas, 18-20 October, 2019.

TEMA welcomes papers on all aspects of medieval and renaissance studies. 

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

The 55th International Congress on Medieval Studies will be held at the Medieval Institute at Western Michigan University, 7-10 May, 2020.

The congress features more than 550 sessions of papers, panel discussions, roundtables, workshops and performances. There are also some 100 business meetings and receptions sponsored by learned societies, associations and institutions. The exhibits hall boasts nearly 70 exhibitors, including publishers, used book dealers and purveyors of medieval sundries.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

The 26th International Medieval Congress will be held at the University of Leeds, 6-9 July, 2020.

The IMC provides an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of all aspects of Medieval Studies. Proposals on any topic related to the Middle Ages are welcome, while every year the IMC also chooses a special thematic focus.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 

The 26th International Medieval Congress will be held at the University of Leeds, 5-8 July, 2021.

The IMC provides an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of all aspects of Medieval Studies. Proposals on any topic related to the Middle Ages are welcome, while every year the IMC also chooses a special thematic focus.

Further information is available on the
conference website.

 
Bursaries, Prizes, and Other Items of Interest
The Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies invites applications for the Snorri Sturluson Icelandic Fellowships. These fellowships are granted annually to writers, translators and scholars (not to university students) in the field of humanities, from outside Iceland, to enable them to stay in Iceland for a period of at least three months, in order to improve their knowledge of the Icelandic language, culture and society.

The amount of the Fellowships is based in principle on travel expenses to and from Iceland, plus living expenses while in the country. Should two equally-qualified candidates be under consideration, preference will, as a rule, be given to a candidate from Eastern or Southern Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America or Oceania.

There are no special application forms for the Fellowships, but applicants should submit a brief but thorough account of the purpose of their stay in Iceland, specifying period of stay, as well as details of education and publications. Applications should be sent by ordinary mail (no e-mail application) no later than 31 October each year.

Further information is available on the
website.
The American Society for Irish Medieval Studies (ASIMS) hosts two annual prizes for essays in Irish Medieval Studies, both of which are presented at the International Congress on Medieval Studies (ICMS) at Kalamazoo. The winner need not be present, and will be contacted officially in writing. Entrants for both prizes must be members of ASIMS at the time of submission in order to be eligible.

The Four Courts Press/Michael Adams Prize in Irish Medieval Studies is awarded for the best essay/article in Irish Medieval Studies published in a book or journal during the previous calendar year (the 2019 prize will therefore be awarded to an essay published in 2018). The prize is a cheque to the value of US$500 from Four Courts Press. A summary of the article will be reprinted in Eolas, the journal of ASIMS. Entries must be submitted by 25 March 2019 in order to be considered.

The Terence Barry Prize for the Best Graduate Paper in Irish Medieval Studies, is awarded to the best conference paper on a subject of relevance to Irish Medieval Studies delivered by a graduate student. The prize is open to graduate students from any field who either have presented or have written and intend to present a paper on a subject of relevance to Irish Medieval Studies at any conference during the previous twelve-month period, beginning and ending with the ICMS in May. The prize will consist of a cheque for reimbursement of the current year’s ICMS registration fees costs, or a cheque of equivalent value. It is a requirement that the winning entry submits a summary statement of the presentation for publication in the society’s journal, Eolas. Especially worthy entries may also be considered for eventual publication in the journal. Entries must be submitted by 15 April 2019 in order to be considered.

Further information is available on the
website.
Brepols Publishers, in conjunction with the European Commission, are currently accepting applications for Erasmus+ traineeships at Brepols Publishing, based in Thessaloniki, Greece, beginning in 2018. This position is for a 3-12 month placement, and the successful candidate will be supporting a team of Bibliographers working on Brepols Publishers’ databases (L'Année philologique, International Medieval Bibliography, International Bibliography for Humanisme and Renaissance, Index Religiosus). Brepols will contribute towards accommodation costs, and candidates may also be eligible for an Erasmus+ grant. Erasmus+ supports traineeships (work placements, internships, etc) abroad for currently enrolled, or recently graduated, Bachelor, Master and Doctoral candidates.

Further information is available on the
Erasmus+ website, as well as by directly contacting Dimitrios Kyratzis at Brepols.
CARMEN, The Worldwide Medieval Network, is pleased to announce the CARMEN Project Prize. This unique award will recognise a project idea in any area of Medieval Studies, which has the potential to advance our understanding of the medieval period or its reception in important and/or innovative ways. Unlike conventional publication prizes, the CARMEN Project Prize seeks to identify the highest-quality academic research at the planning/development stage and to encourage its future progress.

Any individual medievalist, or team of researchers, at any career stage, from those completing research degrees to full professors, are eligible to enter. The research project can relate to any aspect of Medieval Studies or Medievalism (the later reception of the Middle Ages), and can be grounded in any academic discipline or can be multi-disciplinary. Projects should not yet have received substantial funding, and should be in the development stage.

Entries will be judged by a panel of CARMEN Executive Committee members, together with a representative of one of CARMEN’s Affiliated Member Organisations. The Prize primarily offers prestige and recognition amongst the widest possibly community of scholars in Medieval Studies, but also includes: a public prize presentation at the CARMEN Annual Meeting; publicity and opportunities to showcase your project idea; a bursary of up to €350 to attend the CARMEN Annual Meeting (held in mid September) to workshop ideas; expert mentoring from CARMEN members and senior medievalists at CARMEN Affiliated Member Organisations; and recognition of the project’s quality and potential (including a written citation) – valuable if the project goes on to seek funding or participants. Further information is available on the
website.
Medium Ævum, The Society for the Study of Medieval Languages and Literature, has a number of Research Travel Bursaries available to scholars at any stage in their career, who are not in receipt of funding from other sources. All scholars whose research falls within the interests of the Society are invited to apply, although preference in awarding the Bursaries will be given to current members of the Society. The value of the Bursaries is between £300 and £1000 . The Research Travel Bursaries scheme is not designed to be used to fund conference attendance, and successful applicants will be required to submit a report following their research trip, with accounts. The deadlines for applications are 1 March and 1 September, for every calendar year. Further information may be found here.
Other Journals of Interest

Ceræ: An Australasian Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies is currently accepting articles for publication.

Ceræ is a peer-reviewed Australasian journal of medieval and early modern studies. Administered from the University of Western Australia, the journal is directed by a committee of Australian and international graduate students and early career researchers united in our commitment to open-access publishing, the possibilities of the digital humanities, and to forging a strong community of medieval and early modern scholars in the region. Ceræ accepts manuscripts from any discipline related to medieval and early modern studies, including submissions with accompanying audio-visual material.

Articles should be approximately 5,000-7,000 words, and submissions should be made online. For further information, please contact the editor, or visit the journal website.

Early Medieval Europe provides an indispensable source of information and debate on the history of Europe from the later Roman Empire to the eleventh century. The journal is a thoroughly interdisciplinary forum, encouraging the discussion of archaeology, numismatics, palaeography, diplomatic, literature, onomastics, art history, linguistics and epigraphy, as well as more traditional historical approaches. It covers Europe in its entirety, including material on Iceland, Ireland, the British Isles, Scandinavia and Continental Europe (both west and east).

Articles must be submitted online and should be 6,000-10,000 words. Further information may be found
here.

Eras is an online journal edited and produced by postgraduate students from the School of Philosophical, Historical and International Studies at Monash University. As a fully refereed journal with DEST status, Eras is intended as an international forum for current or recently completed Masters and PhD students to publish original research, comments, and reviews in the broad range of fields covered by the School’s teaching and research: Archaeology and Ancient History, Jewish Civilisation, International Studies, History, Philosophy, Religion and Theology.

We are seeking papers from postgraduate students working in any of these fields. We accept submissions year-round. Papers of up to 6,000 words and a short abstract may be submitted here, and editorial guidelines for individual contributors are available here.

The Heroic Age is dedicated to the exploration all aspects of early medieval North-Western Europe, from a variety of vantage points and disciplines from the beginning of the fourth century through the beginning of the thirteenth. By bringing various points of view to the table, we hope to open new vistas of investigation and strengthen ties among early medieval studies and its popular bases. The title "Heroic Age" is applicable to literary, historical, folkloric studies and the material culture that lies behind the people who lived, wrote, and championed their beliefs and created cultures in the period. We will strive to understand and promote understanding of this dynamic early medieval period.

The Heroic Age welcomes and encourages papers on topics unrelated to themed issues at any time. The journal publishes the following types of materials: feature article, editions and translations and book/media reviews. Articles should be 7,000 words including bibliography and endnotes, and conform to The Heroic Age's in-house style, which may be found here. All submissions should be sent to the editor, and further information may be found on the journal website.

Hortulus: The Online Graduate Journal of Medieval Studies is a multidisciplinary refereed postgraduate journal devoted to the literatures, cultures, and ideas of the medieval world. Published electronically twice a year, its mission is to present a forum in which graduate students from around the globe may share their work.

Hortulus has an open submission policy, so submissions are accepted throughout the year. Two issues are published annually: a themed issue each spring, and a general issue each autumn. Graduate students are welcome to submit previously unpublished articles that challenge our readers to look at the Middle Ages from a variety of perspectives by engaging in new theories and interdisciplinary research. Articles be submitted electronically here, and submission guidelines can be found here. Contributions should be in English and roughly 6,000–12,000 words, including all documentation and citational apparatus; book reviews are typically between 500-1,000 words but cannot exceed 2,000.

Interfaces: A Journal of Medieval European Literatures is an open-access peer-reviewed journal, published by the University of Milan, in association with the University of Southern Denmark, the University of York, and the Danish National Research Foundation.

Interfaces aims to open an interdisciplinary and multilingual forum for the study of medieval European literatures, broadly conceived as the products of the interconnected textual cultures which flourished between Late Antiquity and the Renaissance in a region extending from the North Atlantic to the Eastern Mediterranean. It envisages the study of the textual culture of medieval Europe as situated at the intersection of a number of modern disciplines, including history, literature, philology, codicology, philosophy, sociolinguistics, and theology.

Contributions are invited which cross linguistic or disciplinary boundaries in the recognition that the vitality of medieval texts in present-day scholarship and culture demands a space not confined by single philologies, national research traditions, confessions, or disciplinary canons.Interfaces invites papers in English, French, German, Italian, and Spanish. Each paper should have an abstract in English. We encourage the submission of substantial contributions, normally in the range of 35 000-100 000 characters. Further information is available on the journal website.

Marginalia is an online, peer-reviewed journal for medievalists, which aims to fill a gap in the publishing world by creating a vehicle for graduate publication. It sprang out of, and continues to be closely associated with, the Cambridge-based Medieval Reading Group. The first issue of the journal came out in 2005, and since then two issues have been released each year.

The Marginalia committee will consider articles and book reviews on any aspect of the Middle Ages in England, and from any discipline. For the purposes of clarification, we consider the Middle Ages to encompass the years between 500 and 1500 AD, but will consider material that falls slightly outside these parameters if we feel it is particularly relevant to the study of medieval England. Further information may be found on the
journal website.
Parergon publishes articles on all aspects of medieval and early modern studies. We are especially interested in material that crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries and takes new approaches. Articles should be within 5,000 and 8,000 words length, with footnotes kept to a reasonable proportion. (Notes of 3,000 words may be considered.) Further information on submission guidelines and forthcoming issues may be found here.
postmedieval: a journal of medieval cultural studies aims to develop a present-minded medieval studies in which contemporary events, issues, ideas, problems, objects, and texts serve as triggers for critical investigations of the Middle Ages. The journal also underscores the important value of medieval studies and the longest possible historical perspectives to the ongoing development of contemporary critical and cultural theories that remain under-historicised.
The journal is published four times a year, usually as themed, guest-edited issues. Articles may not exceed 6,000 words in length. Further information on submission guidelines and forthcoming issues may be found
here.

 

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